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Beta-Gamma Monitoring - doe-hdbk-1113-98_reaffirm_2005_040148
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Radiological Safety Trainign for Uranium Facilities
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Special Radiological Surveys and Techniques for Release of Materials


DOE-HDBK-1113-98
Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities
Module 104 Internal Dose Control
The general method for personnel scanning for alpha contamination is
to scan at approximately 2 inches/ sec at a distance of approximately
inch. For personnel scanning for beta contamination, it is
recommended to scan at 2 inches/ sec at a distance of inch.
However, the surface being surveyed (i.e., soil, building surfaces,
equipment, personnel), the scanning speed, and the instrument
response time will determine the level of contamination that can be
detected.
Failing to survey properly can have the same results as not surveying
at all. Contamination may go undetected and may be tracked out of the
radiological area. Once outside the radiological area, the
contamination may be transferred from surface to surface. This
transfer of contamination could result in uranium ending up inside
your body, the body of a co-worker, or even the bodies of your family
members and friends. The potential for spreading undetected
contamination should always be kept in mind when performing self-
monitoring.
iv. Interference from Radon
One of the problems encountered when monitoring for contamination
is interference from radon and its decay products.
Radon is a radioactive gas that occurs naturally in the environment. It
decays by alpha emission in the first of a series of very short half-life
radionuclides that decay by alpha or beta-gamma emission.
There is a simple, inexpensive alternative to determine if the
contamination is due to radon. The effective half-life for radon
39


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