Quantcast Acquisition - doe-hdbk-1139-1-2000_CN10026

 

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Table 1. Hazard Analyses Required by Directives - doe-hdbk-1139-1-2000_CN10025
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Chemical Management - index
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DOE Materials Exchange


DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2000
Change Notice No. 1
2.2 Acquisition
Acquisition includes approval, procurement, onsite makeup and mixtures of
chemicals, individuals/organizations bringing chemicals onsite, and any other
mechanism by which sites acquire chemicals. Acquisition management arranges
for the procurement of needed chemicals after work planning, an approved hazard
analysis, and life cycle analysis. In other words, effective acquisition management
addresses options for eliminating or substituting less toxic chemicals, assessing the
feasibility of controlling the associated hazards, and assessing the costs involved in
the safe disposal of chemicals. Ultimately, acquisition management should lead to
the identification of chemical substances that can be used in a safe, non-polluting
manner.
Managers, scientists, and supervisors consider a number of factors during the work
planning and acquisition of chemicals, including:
Need for the chemical;
Hazards of the chemical;
Use of non-hazardous or less hazardous substitutes when appropriate;
Justifiable quantities;
Use of available excess chemicals in lieu of new purchases;
Stability/shelf life/legacy hazards;
Suitability of storage facilities;
Availability of an appropriate safe and environmentally acceptable means for
the final disposition of environmentally sensitive chemicals, products, and by-
products;
Waste minimization and pollution prevention, e.g., use of micro scale vs. macro
scale chemistry;
Required safety documentation [e.g., material safety data sheet (MSDS)]; and
Input of chemical information into the site chemical management tracking
system.
Excess chemicals from within a site's inventory, as well from other sites, should be
considered as the primary source of supply. Electronic procurement systems that
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