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Introduction and Scope cont'd
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Chemical Management - index
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Analyze the Hazards


DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2000
Change Notice No. 1
1.0
Chemical Management as part of Integrated Safety Management
This chapter presents a discussion of the five ISM core functions from the
DOE P 450.4 (ISM)
perspective of chemical management. To accomplish work safely and protect
workers, the public, and the environment, the safety system functions to identify
hazards and establish controls. These hazards range from commonly encountered
workplace hazards to one-of-a-kind process hazards found in existing newly
designed to old, non-operational facilities. For personnel who plan tasks involving
chemicals, the goal is to ensure that safety documentation for the facility,
procedures for conducting the task, and supporting hazard identification and
analysis adequately address the full range and scope of chemical hazard(s).
1.1 Define the Scope of Work
Translating a mission into work is the first step to planning and accomplishing work
tasks safely and effectively. Planning considers the entire life cycle of a mission,
and as such, the entire life cycle of chemicals required to accomplish the work must
also be considered.
Defining expectations for the scope of work addresses the goals and objectives for
both DOE and the contractor to accomplish the work. At this step in planning,
issues relating to chemicals that could be considered include, but are not limited to,
efficacy versus toxicity, engineering controls, chemical disposal, emergency
response, medical monitoring, personnel training and exposure, facility and
equipment contamination, and release to the environment. The impact of these
issues should be weighed against performance expectations and resolved to support
the mission and the allocation of resources.
If a site's mission involves the use of chemicals, then some of the contractual
requirements address chemical management, i.e., chemicals used to accomplish
work, chemicals in storage or transportation, or chemicals as waste materials.
When a change in the scope of work, or in requirements or regulations affects a
site's chemical management, the sufficiency of the set of contractual chemical
management requirements must be evaluated. As a mission matures and the work
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