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Classes of Chemicals that may become Shock Sensitive
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Chemical Management - index
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Chemical Lifecycle Management


DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2000
Vinyl acetate)
Vinylalkynes with alpha Hydrogen:
diAcytylene,
Vinylacetylene
Note: Some chemicals such as secondary alcohols will form explosive peroxides, but these
products need to be evaporated to dryness before the explosion hazard manifests itself. A critical
part of managing the life cycle of shock sensitive chemicals involves the identification of those
chemicals (see below).
Handling and Use:
Respect the chemicals and the dangers they present
If you find chemicals that are or have the potential of becoming shock sensitive and they are
outdated (expired shelf life), suspect, or show signs of degradation, immediately contact your
supervisor and your organization's environment, safety and health (ES&H) or hazardous
materials department.
DO NOT TOUCH OR MOVE SUSPECT CHEMICALS!
When working with shock sensitive chemicals
Make sure that you have access to the MSDS, the chemical is labeled as required by your
facility, and the container is entered into your facility's hazardous chemical management
program. Study the chemical's MSDS and label. Look for information about the chemical's
reactivity, stability and hazards. If there is a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
diamond or a Hazard Material Information System (HMIS) label, look for a 2, 3, or 4 in the
yellow "Instability" (formerly Reactivity) section or a W (water reactive) in the white "Special
Hazards" section.
Closely follow approved work procedures and hazard controls. Review information from other
chemical safety resources. Check with your facility's chemical safety personnel. Use appropriate
personal protective equipment (PPE). Protect the chemical from shock, friction or heating.
Standards and Codes:
29CFR1910.1200 Hazard Communication
Reactive hazards must be noted on the MSDS.
29CFR1910.1450 Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories
The chemical hygiene plan should address shock-sensitive hazards.
NFPA 45 - Standard on Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals
D- 5


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