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Hazard Analysis - doe-hdbk-1139-1-2000_CN10023
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Chemical Management - index
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Table 1. Hazard Analyses Required by Directives - doe-hdbk-1139-1-2000_CN10025


DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2000
Change Notice No. 1
Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, or "Laboratory Standard"], and
various substance specific standards in Subparts Z of 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR
1926. EPA also has requirements for performing hazard analyses, such as the
40 CFR 68.67
Chemical Process Safety Standards (40 CFR 68.67). In addition, Section 313,
Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) contain hazard
assessment requirements. Many of the hazard assessment components of these
standards crosscut one another. Therefore, managers should evaluate and describe
the relationship of these requirements to assure a coordinated approach which will
greatly facilitate the hazard analysis process.
It is important to recognize that requirements flow down through the site, facility,
operations, and task levels. The ability to communicate and exchange information
regarding the various levels of hazards and risk analysis data is an important
component of an ISMS. As a part of ISM, managers should be able to quickly
understand the requirements, hazards, and controls of their chemical. The
establishment of clear, direct lines of communication and exchange of information
among those who conduct and use hazard analyses will provide results that support
other needed analyses (engineering, operations, and work planning), help resolve
conflicts, and eliminate duplication of efforts.
Table 1, "Hazard Analyses Required by Directives" (taken from DOE-STD-1120-
DOE-STD-1120-98
98, "Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition
Activities"), presents a model integrated approach to hazard analysis, which was
piloted at Hanford. This table illustrates one example of the types of hazard
analyses required by various directives.
Additional sources of information on hazard analysis and exposure assessment are
listed in Appendix C, Program Resources.
18


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