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Chemical Safety and Lifecycle Management Program
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Chemical Management - index
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Drivers


DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006
transportation, inventory and reporting, waste disposal, regulatory burden, and labor are all
lifecycle stages that must be considered when determining the true cost of a chemical. For
example, (1) longer storage times lead to increased expenses in terms of warehouse space usage,
the cost of utility usage to maintain particular indoor environments, shelf- life monitoring, and the
potential for the chemical to become a waste; (2) purchasing a given chemical product from
multiple manufacturers increases costs associated with the inventory and maintenance of
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs); (3) storing chemicals with special hazards  * will require
special storage conditions and equipment such as refrigerators or glove -boxes that consume
resources; (4) time-sensitive chemicals that require constant monitoring. Due diligence must be
given, therefore, to ensure that a comprehensive analysis is completed prior to the acquisition of
chemicals.
Costs associated with chemical wastes require particular consideration. Costs associated with
waste disposal are related to the number and severity of hazards associated with the chemical as
well as the volume of the chemical. In some cases, a waste-disposal vendor cannot be found to
accept a particular chemical, resulting in continued storage costs. Because of the potential for
significant cost liabilities, the procurement of chemicals must be carefully controlled.
The CSLM program provides an effective mechanism to control costs by requiring the user to
methodically consider total lifecycle costs prior to making procurement decisions. For instance,
significant reductions in chemical costs can be achieved by:
Purchasing the minimum quantity required,
Having policies and procedures that require pollution prevention and waste minimization
reviews at all stages of CSLM,
Limiting all chemical procurements to just a few strategic source suppliers, when possible,
Adopting Just- in-Time (JIT) inventory practices for bulk use (i.e., high consumption)
chemicals and for chemicals with special hazards,
Promoting awareness of special hazard chemicals to chemical users, and
Controlling the procurement of special ha zard chemicals by requiring potential users to
justify their use, with product substitution as a preferred alternative.
2.0
Scope
This guide is applicable to all CSLM activities, including the acquisition, use, storage,
transportation, and disposition o f all chemicals and chemical-containing products. This includes,
but is not limited to:
hazardous chemicals as defined in the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR
1910.1200, including Appendices A and B),
*
Special-hazard chemicals include time -sensitive chemicals such as peroxide formers , which become hazardous
upon p rolonged storage, and high-hazard chemicals such as unstable reactive chemicals, shock-sensitive substances,
explosives, pyrophorics, NFPA Class 4 oxidizers, certain organic peroxides, and high-acute-toxicity chemicals .
2


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