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Appendix C- Acronyms cont'd
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Configuration Management - index
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Performing reanalysis cont'd


DOE-STD-1073-2003
Configuration Management
APPENDIX D - REGENERATION/RECOVERY/DOCUMENTATION
OF REQUIREMENTS, BASES, AND ENGINEERING
INFORMATION
For new construction, i.e., new facilities and major modifications to existing facilities, the
design requirements should be identified and documented as part of the design process.
The design requirements define the facility physical configuration and the functions of its
parts. However, for existing facilities that may lack thorough documentation of the
design basis, the requirements for previously installed SSCs may not be documented or
available. In these cases, it may not make sense from a cost perspective to immediately
reconstruct the design requirements; although the contractor should document the new or
revised design requirements as maintenance and modifications are performed at the
facility or activity. In any event, the contractor must ensure that the SSCs can perform
the safety functions assumed in the DSA. If additional information is needed to establish
the design requirements or to ensure that a SSC is capable of performing its assumed
safety function, this documentation can be obtained by regenerating the information or
interviewing technical experts who are knowledgeable about the particular equipment or
situation.
Maximum advantage should be taken of pertinent existing safety analyses and design
information (i.e., requirements and their bases) that are immediately available or can be
retrieved through reasonable efforts. Missing information can often be found through the
identification and evaluation of existing engineering documents (e.g., drawings,
calculations, analyses, and documented justification to support engineering judgments).
As a part of the evaluation effort described above, selected design material may need to
be reverified for accuracy and applicability. The need for reverification should be
reserved for those design documents for which the accuracy of the original
calculations/analyses is uncertain. Reverification also addresses the degree of as-built
variance from the current design requirements and should include techniques for physical
verification such as system walkdowns. Once the design requirements are established for
the facility, a rigorous program of change control and document control must be initiated
to maintain the accuracy of the information. Failure to install rigorous programs of
change control and document control following the establishment or verification of
design requirements could result in the need for expensive, repeated efforts to reverify the
information later.
Methods that have proven successful for reestablishing missing requirements information
include:
Performing reanalysis. This approach is basically equivalent to redesign. It
applies the design process to determine design requirements. Although it is the
most technically acceptable method for regenerating missing requirements, this
D-1


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