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Document Control - doe-std-1073-20030065
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Storing Documents


DOE-STD-1073-2003
Configuration Management
6.1
Identifying Documents to be Controlled
Contractors must determine what documents need to be controlled. They also must
define "document owners" who are responsible for developing and revising the technical
content of the documents and ensuring they are maintained current. Document owners
will also establish the schedules for document revisions, distribution, and retrieval.
Documents to be controlled should include those documents that reflect the facility's
requirements, performance criteria, and associated design bases. However, the number of
documents that must be controlled should be limited because of the resources required to
properly control documents.
DSAs, the TSRs, the documented design requirements, the safety management plans, and
any other documents that are referenced by, or support, the DSAs should be controlled
documents. Contractors should assess controlled documents to determine if they need to
be updated whenever changes are made to the facility or activity configuration, the design
requirements, or other documentation that might impact them. Typical controlled
documents include:
DSAs;
Authorization Agreements and associated references;
Safety Management Plans;
hazard controls, including TSRs;
documents that identify or define design requirements;
design specification and calculations;
accident analyses;
software data and manuals for operation and maintenance of critical software;
key procedures;
key drawings; and
key vendor supplied documents.
SDDs and other similar documents may contain specific information about preventive
and mitigative SSCs that is too detailed to include in the DSA, but which facility
personnel need to understand design, operation, and maintenance of the facility, activity,
or operation. Whenever a change is initiated, the contractor should also review the
applicable SDDs to determine if they need to be updated. The SDDs typically include
detailed design and operating descriptions;
diagrams, such as electrical schematics and piping and instrumentation diagrams;
and
load lists.
6-2


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