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DOE-STD-1098-99
Radiological Control
Excellence in Radiological Control
March 2005
PART 2 Leadership in Radiological Control
Superior, consistent performance is achieved when qualified individuals use approved procedures and management
actively monitors the workplace and assesses ongoing activities. Such ongoing activities include, but are not limited to,
operations, remediation, laboratory work, research and development, and cleanup. Constant review and informed interest
by senior management are required to achieve a superior radiological control program. Management at all levels should
emphasize the need for high standards for radiological control through direct communication, instruction, and inspection
of the work space. The DOE Operations Office Manager and the contractor senior site executive responsible for the site
should have a basic knowledge of radiation, its effects, and radiological control requirements. The DOE Operations
Office Manager and the contractor senior site executive should also be familiar with the current radiological control
performance record. Key principles common in a successful, well-managed radiological control program are provided in
this Chapter.
121 Senior Management Commitment
1.
Senior managers should establish high standards for radiological control performance and frequently communicate
these standards and management expectations to the work force.
2.
Senior managers should state in writing their firm commitment to a radiological control program of the highest
quality. Management commitment and support should be demonstrated, in part, by allocating sufficient resources,
including personnel, and providing for training to ensure workers are qualified for their assigned duties.
3.
Managers should ensure that orientation, training, and indoctrination reinforce rules and guidelines for each worker
to control radiation exposure and radiological conditions.
4.
Managers should hold workers and their supervisors accountable for radiological control performance. Relevant
knowledge and performance should be assessed as a specific part of each individual's performance evaluation. This
assessment should not be limited to those who perform radiological work, since many other workers have an impact
on the radiological control program.
5.
Senior managers should solicit feedback from their radiological control professionals, line management, and
workers on radiological control performance.
6.
Senior managers should adopt and promote a positive attitude toward radiological control that encourages
initiatives to identify concerns at an early stage, to prevent conditions from deteriorating, and to promote doing the
right job correctly the first time.
7.
Prevention of the spread of radioactive material is usually less costly than remediation. Management should be
willing to accept change that will improve radiological control performance and should foster this mindset
throughout the organization.
8.
The authority and responsibility to establish a comprehensive and effective radiological control training program
should be assigned to line managers and their subordinates. Training, in most cases, should be provided by a
dedicated training organization, but the responsibility for quality and effectiveness rests with line management.
9.
Senior managers should be alert to opportunities for minimizing the generation of radioactive waste and discharges
to the environment, controlling contamination at its source, and reducing radiation exposure to workers and the
public.
10. Reporting a problem to a superior (contractor or DOE) does not absolve the manager from promptly fixing or
mitigating a situation.
1-8


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