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Controlled Area - doe-std-1128-98_ch10311
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DOE Standard Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection In Plutonium Facilities
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Design Objectives - doe-std-1128-98_ch10313


DOE-STD-1128-98
C.4.4.2
Personnel-Decontamination Room
A personnel-decontamination room (or station) should be provided for
each plutonium facility. It should be located near or in the change rooms.
A decontamination room with the capability to decontaminate male and
female personnel simultaneously should be considered. The use of
installed partitions or curtains should be considered for this purpose. An
adequately equipped decontamination room should have communications
equipment, a workbench with a cabinet for decontamination supplies, an
examination chair, a sink, and showers. Both the sink and showers
should be connected to a holding tank for sampling or routed to the
process waste. The room should contain equipment for performing nasal
irrigations and initial surveys of nasal swipes.
C.4.4.3
Health Physics Laboratory Office
Health physics personnel in a plutonium facility should be assigned
laboratory office space at or near the exit from the process area into the
controlled area. As a rule of thumb for determining space needs, one
radiation protection technologist should be available for every 10
radiation workers. Space should be included for the readout of radiation-
protection instrumentation, preparation of radiation protection records,
counting equipment, and storage of portable instruments.
C.4.4.4
Mechanical Equipment
Where possible, mechanical equipment (e.g., motors, pumps, and valves
that may be a source of radioactive contamination) should be located in
the process area. Enclosures that will contain the contamination should
be placed around the equipment. Such enclosures should be easy to
decontaminate.
C.5 SERVICE AND UTILITY SYSTEMS
Utility services should be designed to provide reliability that is consistent with 1) the
operational requirements for the control and confinement of radioactive materials and 2)
the potential hazards under all probable conditions. The services and utilities that are
important to the continuity of essential plant functions should be designed to the same
integrity level as the function they serve. Some service or utility systems are connected to
other systems or structures that are essential to prevent the release of radioactive materials.
Such service or utility systems must be designed so that if they fail, connecting systems
will remain functional.
C.5.1
Ventilation Systems
Ventilation systems include the supply and exhaust systems and the associated
ductwork, fans, air cleaning, tempering, or humidity control devices, and associated
monitoring instrumentation and controls required to confine radioactive materials
within the ventilation system. The design of ventilation system components does
not include process vessels, primary confinement or containment housing, or the
building structure.
C-21


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