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Developing Event Scenarios - doe-std-1128-98_ch10241
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DOE Standard Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection In Plutonium Facilities
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Protective Actions - doe-std-1128-98_ch10243


DOE-STD-1128-98
Plume depletion during transport. As it is transported downwind, an aerosol
plume will be depleted by gravitational settling of particles. Because of the
high density of plutonium and its compounds, this depletion effect can be very
significant in reducing the dose. Therefore, a consequence model that accounts
for plume depletion by gravitational settling should be used. When analyzing
consequences of any postulated accidental criticality, any model selected
should account for the decay during transport of short-lived fission product
gases.
Ground deposition. Following passage of a plume, the amount of plutonium
deposited on the ground will determine whether long-term intervention to
minimize the dose to the resident population will be required. The consequence
model selected should calculate ground deposition to support protective action
planning.
9.2.2
Program Elements
Properties and characteristics of plutonium and its compounds must be considered
in formulating the emergency management program elements. Following are
specific program element considerations related to the hazardous properties of
plutonium.
(a)
Emergency Response Organization. The primary influence of plutonium's
hazardous properties on the Emergency Response Organization (ERO) is in
the staffing of the consequence assessment component. As will be discussed
in e) below, staff should be assigned to the ERO who are knowledgeable of
and able to quantitatively evaluate the radiological aspects of the hazard.
(b)
Offsite Response Interfaces. The specific properties of the hazardous
material do not significantly affect the content of this program element.
(c)
Operational Emergency Event Classes. As with all hazardous materials,
classification of emergencies for plutonium facilities should be based on the
predicted consequences at specific receptor locations, as compared with
numerical criteria for taking protective action (total effective dose
equivalent). The classification of the postulated event or condition should be
determined during the hazards assessment process and the observable
features and indications identified as Emergency Action Levels (EALs) for
that event/condition.
(d)
Notification. The specific properties of the hazardous material do not
significantly affect the content of this program element.
(e)
Consequence Assessment. As discussed in section 9.3.1 c) and e), models
and calculational methods used for consequence assessment should be
appropriate to the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the
hazards. Models used to calculate and project the radiological consequences
of a release of plutonium should be the same ones used in the hazards
assessment process. If the same models are not used, the differences between
outputs should be characterized and documented to avoid the potential for
confusion and indecision during response to an actual emergency. The
9-6


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