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Waste Treatments - doe-std-1128-98_ch10224
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DOE Standard Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection In Plutonium Facilities
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Liquid Waste - doe-std-1128-98_ch10226


DOE-STD-1128-98
Electropolishing to remove the thinnest metal surface has been very effective and
produces a relatively small waste volume, especially when one of the wetted
sponge units is used rather than an emersion tank. Surface scabbling has been used
in decontamination of concrete, and various abrasive blasting methods have also
been effective. Strippable and self-stripping coatings may be used to decontaminate
surfaces, even though the primary application of strippable coatings has been in
preventing contamination of surfaces.
There are occasionally mixed strategies that work well. Used HEPA filters may be
removed from their frame for compaction. Metal frames may be decontaminated
and wood frames may be incinerated.
8.3.4
Sampling and Monitoring
Solid waste is monitored for several reasons: to determine if it can be released as
sanitary (or hazardous) waste; to distinguish its classification as either LLW or
TRU waste, depending on the concentration of transuranic isotopes; and to obtain
defensible values for documenting shipping and disposal quantities. See section
4.2.4.2 for guidance on release surveys.
8.3.5
Storage and Disposal
Solid sanitary waste, hazardous waste, and LLW can normally be disposed of using
existing procedures. Transuranic waste, HLW, and most mixed waste may have to
be stored for a period of time awaiting approval of disposal facilities; they will
have to be stored in a manner that prevents routine and accidental impact on the
environment. They must be protected from unauthorized access, fire, flood, or
water damage. Containers must be protected from corrosion or other deterioration
and an accurate inventory of the material must be kept. Most facilities prefer to
store such material in a form that they believe will be shippable.
8-13


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