Quantcast Table 2.8. Potential Hazards or Damage to Materials from Exposure to Radiation - doe-std-1128-98_ch10036

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Table 2.8. Potential Hazards or Damage to Materials from Exposure to Radiation
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Back
Self-Heating - doe-std-1128-98_ch10035
Up
DOE Standard Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection In Plutonium Facilities
Next
Redox Reactions - doe-std-1128-98_ch10037


DOE-STD-1128-98
Table 2.8. Potential Hazards or Damage to Materials from Exposure to Radiation
Radiation-Induced Reaction
Potential Hazard or Damage Problem
Radiolysis of oxygen-contaminated glovebox
Production of ozone-damage
atmospheres
to elastomers: gloves, seals,
etc.
Gaseous PuF6
Deposition of solid PuF4 on
equipment
PuO2 exposed to hydrocarbons or humid
Production of hydrogen gas
environments
pressure buildup in
nonvented containers.
Ion exchange resins
Damaged resin can react
Violently with HNO3 or other
Oxidizers. Also may result in
hydrogen gas- pressure
buildup.
CCl4 saturated with H2O
Production of Cl2. C2Cl6 HCl,
and phosgene.
Polyethylene
Disintegrates with production
of H2.
Polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastics
Disintegrates with production
of HCl-corrosion.
Tri-n-butylphosphate
Production of hydrogen and
oxygen-pressure buildup in
nonvented containers.
Aqueous plutonium solutions
Production of polymeric
plutonium hydroxide
(plutonium polymer), which
plates out on vessel surfaces
and piping, producing
swelling, cracking, loss of
Low-acidity plutonium solutions
Increase in leachability.
It would be futile and inappropriate to list, let alone discuss, all the possible
radiolytic reactions affecting plutonium-handling. However, it is important to
recognize the potential for and anticipate the consequences of these reactions.
The following sections cover a broad range of the types of radiation-induced
damage common to plutonium handling.
2.5.2.1 Hydrogen Production
The G-value for the production of H2 by the alpha radiolysis of pure
water is 1.9±0.1 molecules of hydrogen per 100 eV (Prevost-Bérnas
et al., 1952). Cleveland (1970) calculates that the energy released in
2-22


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.