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Design Features - doe-std-1128-98_ch10250
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Other Features - doe-std-1128-98_ch10252


DOE-STD-1128-98
Carpets are not recommended because they are difficult to clean and survey and
bulky to dispose of and they do not adequately protect the underlying surface. In
some areas, such as control rooms, their use may be justified by noise control
requirements; however, their contamination control limitations should be
considered. If used, carpets should be surveyed frequently and disposed of as
radioactive waste when they become contaminated.
10.2.2
Ventilation Systems
In addition to decommissioning considerations, the design of the ventilation system
will depend on the operations that will be conducted in the facility. Adequate air
flow for all operations and good design practices will help keep the facility clean
during operations and will facilitate decommissioning. Fiberglass duct work may
present a fire hazard and may be more difficult to decontaminate than stainless
steel, especially stainless steel that has been electropolished. Welded joints are less
likely to collect contamination than bolted ones; however, bolted joints are easier to
remove and the most contaminated areas are readily accessible for cleaning.
Filters should be positioned in ventilation systems to minimize contamination of
ductwork (e.g., filtration of glove-box exhaust air before it enters a duct leading to
a plenum).
10.2.3 Piping Systems
Potentially contaminated piping systems that are imbedded in concrete are a
common and relatively expensive decommissioning problem. Most often, they
must be sealed and removed last, after all other radioactive material has been
removed and the building is being demolished by conventional methods. Often,
they provide the major impetus for demolishing a building rather than converting it
to some non-nuclear use. For this reason, it is best to run pipes in chases or tunnels
that have been lined (usually with stainless steel) to prevent contamination from
penetrating building surfaces. To minimize hand jackhammer work required during
decommissioning, floor drains should not be enclosed in concrete.
10.2.4 Soil-Contamination Considerations
Depending on the activity levels found, locations where contaminated effluents
have penetrated the ground may require excavation during decommissioning. The
facility design should minimize such areas. Particular attention should be paid to
storm runoff from roofs, storage areas, contaminated equipment storage, and liquid
waste treatment impoundments (including sanitary sewage systems if they may
receive some small amount of contamination during the life of the facility.)
10-7


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