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Evaluation Guideline (EG)
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Nuclear facility - doe-std-3009-94_cn3_3-30-060021


DOE-STD -3009-94
degree that they can be a contributor to a significant uncontrolled release of hazardous
material (e.g., 115-volt wiring as initiator of a fire) or major energy sources such as
explosive energy.
Hazard analysis. The determination of material, system, process, and plant characteristics
that can produce undesirable consequences, followed by the assessment of hazardous
situations associated with a process or activity. Largely qualitative techniques are used to
pinpoint weaknesses in design or operation of the facility that could lead to accidents. The
hazards analysis examines the complete spectrum of potential accidents that could expose
members of the public, o nsite workers, facility workers, and the environment to hazardous
materials.
Hazard categorization. Evaluation of the consequences of unmitigated releases to
categorize facilities or operations into the following hazard categories:
1.
Hazard Category 1: The hazard analysis shows the potential for significant offsite
consequences.
2.  Hazard Category 2: The hazard analysis shows the potential for significant onsite
consequences.
3.  Hazard Category 3: The hazard analysis shows the potential for only significant
localized consequences. [10 CFR 830]
DOE-STD-1027 provides guidance and radiological threshold values for determining the
hazard category of a facility. DOE-STD-1027 interprets Hazard Category 1 facilities as
Category A reactors and other facilities designated as such by the Program Secretarial
Officer.
Hazardous material. Any solid, liquid, or gaseous material that is toxic, explosive,
flammable, corrosive, or otherwise physically or biologically threatening to health.
Candidate hazards include radioactive materials, hazardous chemicals as defined by
OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1910.1450; any material assigned a reportable
quantity value in 40 CFR 302, Table 302.4; threshold planning quantities in 40 CFR 355
Appendix A; threshold planning quantities in 29 CFR 1910.119; level of concern
quantities in EPA's "Technical Guidance for Hazard Analysis-- Emergency Planning for
Extremely Hazardous Substances"; or materials rated as 3 or 4 in National Fire Protection
Association 704 "Identification of the Fire Haza rds of Materials."
Limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The limits that represent the lowest
functional capability or performance level of safety-related structures, systems, and
components required for safe operations. [10 CFR 830]
Limiting control settings (LCSs). Settings on safety systems that control process
variables to prevent exceeding a safety limit. [10 CFR 830]
Mitigative feature. Any structure, system, or component that serves to mitigate the
consequences of a release of hazardous materials in an accident scenario. [DOE-STD-
1027]
Nonreactor nuclear facility. Those facilities, activities, or operations that involve, or will
involve, radioactive and/or fissionable materials in such form and quantity that a nuclear or
nuclear explosive ha zard potentially exists to workers, the public, or the environment, but
does not include accelerators and their operations and does not include activities involving
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