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DOE-EM-STD-5503-94
14.0. SPILL CONTAINMENT
14.1. BACKGROUND
The intent of this section of the HASP is to meet the requirements of
29 CFR 1910.120 (b)(4)(ii)(j). The spill containment program should address all hazardous
substance spill scenarios that are likely to occur at the site. In addition, the spill containment
program should also provide procedures to contain and isolate the entire volume of any hazardous
substance spilled in the course of a transfer, accident, or onsite release.
The overall objectives of the Spill Containment chapter are to:
Identify the minimum requirements of the spill containment program that may be relevant
to the site and provide methods to contain and isolate the entire volume of any hazardous
substance spilled in the course of a transfer, major spill, or an onsite release; and
Provide information on the initial spill action, spill response evaluation and organization,
and spill clean-up procedures.
14.2. PREPLANNING
In order to develop a successful spill containment program, an assessment should be conducted
of the site conditions, current operations, and planned activities. The assessment should carefully
examine all hazardous materials on site for where and how the materials are:
Stored (e.g., location, type of container),
Handled (e.g., processed, used, transferred), and
Transported (e.g., mode, routes).
As part of the assessment, each area or activity should be analyzed for potential accidental
releases or spills. Examples of situations that have potential for spill or release are:
Bulging or corroded containers,
Transfer line connections (e.g., leaking seals, misaligned connections),
Metal fatigue of storage tanks,
Leaking or inoperable valves, and
Poor housekeeping (e.g., drums improperly staged).
Many potential spills can be avoided through application of proper engineering controls to
hazards identified in the assessment. In areas where storage, handling, and transportation
activities occur, preplanning to contain the largest volume of material that could be released in
the area will minimize worker exposure. The containment measure should be appropriate to the
hazardous material(s) identified and should be installed in the area or located nearby. The
following examples are measures most frequently used:
14-1


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