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DOE-HDBK-1130-98
b.
It may be released when the surface is disturbed (buffing, grinding, us ing volatile liquids
for cleaning, etc.).
c.
Over time it may "weep," leach, or otherwise become loose or removable.
2.
Removable contamination is contamination that can easily be removed from surfaces. Any
object that comes in contact with it may become contaminated.
a.
It may be transferred by casual contact, wiping, brushing, or washing.
b.
Air movement across removable contamination could cause the contamination to
become airborne.
3.
Airborne contamination is contamination suspended in air.
Table 9-1
Types of Radioactive Contamination
Types
Definitions (Objective EO1)
Cannot be removed by casual contact.
It may be released when the surface is disturbed
(buffing, grinding, using volatile liquids for cleaning,
etc.).
Fixed
Over time, may become loose or removable.
Contamination
May be transferred by casual contact.
Any object that makes contact with it may in turn
become contaminated.
Air movement across removable contamination may
Removable
cause the contamination to become airborne.
Contamination
Airborne contamination is contamination suspended in
Airborne
the air.
Contamination
C. Radioactive Contamination
Radiological work is required in areas and in systems that are contaminated by design (e.g.,
maintenance of valves in radioactive fluid systems).
Regardless of the precautions taken, radioactive material will sometimes contaminate objects,
areas, and people.
1.
Sources
The following are some sources of radioactive contamination.
a.
Leaks or breaks in radioactive fluid systems.
b.
Leaks or breaks in air-handling systems for radioactive areas.
c.
Airborne contamination depositing on surfaces.
74


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