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Contamination Control - hdbk1132990058
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Design Considerations - index
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Airborne Effluents cont'd


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
confirm that they can be heard in the ambient conditions of the area in which
they are placed. ANSI N2.3 provides guidance for the design of evacuation
alarm systems.
If a criticality excursion could potentially occur, including a potential for
personnel exposures, nuclear accident dosimeters should be installed. ANS
8.3, Criticality Accident Alarm System, provides guidance for criticality accident
alarms.
In addition to a local station alarm, radiation monitoring systems (i.e., criticality
alarms, CAMs, alarms associated with stack monitoring systems) should have
central (i.e., control room or radiation monitoring office) readout and alarm
panels that are accessible after an accident so that internal conditions can be
evaluated.
1.3.6
Airborne Effluents . For nonradioactive hazardous gaseous or airborne
effluents, the point of release is the point at which the effluent exits the stack,
vent, or other release points.
Exhaust ducts (or stacks) that may contain radioactive airborne effluents should
be provided with effluent monitoring systems. The monitoring capability should
cover the range from normal effluent concentrations to the maximum
concentration expected from a credible accidental release. For exhaust outlets
that may contain plutonium, uranium, enriched uranium, tritium, transuranics or
fission products, and other radioisotopes above ambient levels, two
independent monitoring systems should be considered.
Backup capability for monitoring systems should be considered in the design of
each system (e.g., redundant detectors, additional sample line ports, additional
sampler trains, etc.). Continuous stack sampling and continuous radiation
detection should also be considered. ANSI N13.1 provides guidance on
designing sampling systems that provide accurate, representative sampling of
effluent streams.
I-43


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