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Confinement Ventilation Systems cont'd - hdbk1132990038
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Design Considerations - index
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Primary Confinement System - hdbk1132990040


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
the closure of such dampers should not compromise confinement system
functions where the loss of confinement might pose a greater threat than the
spread of fire. In such cases, alternative fire protection means (e.g., duct
wrapping) should be substituted for fire barrier closure. In no case should a
sprinkler system be considered a fire barrier substitute. (All penetrations of a
fire barrier should be sealed, including conduit, cable trays, piping, and
ductwork. In the selection of seals, requirements for pressure and water-
tightness should be considered.)
1.2
CONFINEMENT SYSTEM DESIGN ASPECTS BY FACILITY TYPE
The preceding discussions of primary, secondary, and tertiary confinement generally
apply to all nuclear facilities. The degree of applicability should be determined on a
case-by-case basis. The following discussions provide some guidance on how to make
these determinations as a function of facility type.
A description of the facility types is included in Section 2. " ontainment"is addressed
C
in Section 2.10.8.
1.2.1
Plutonium Processing and Handling Facilities and Plutonium Storage
Facilities (PSFs). The degree of confinement required is generally based on
the most restrictive hazards anticipated. Therefore, the type, quantity, and form
(physical and chemical) of the materials to be stored should be considered. For
materials in a form not readily dispersible, a single confinement barrier may be
sufficient. However, for more readily dispersible materials, such as liquids and
powders, and for materials with inherent dispersal mechanisms, such as
pressurized cases and pyrophoric forms, multiple confinement barriers should
be considered. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide
(R.G.) 3.12, " eneral Design Guide for Ventilation Systems of Plutonium
G
Processing and Fuel Fabrication Plants,"provides useful guidance that should
be considered.
Generally, for the most restrictive cases anticipated, three types of confinement
systems should be considered:
I-23


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