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Structural Design - hdbk1132990190
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Design Considerations - index
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Electrical Systems


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
Lateral Loads on Partitions . Consider a minimum live load of 5 psf applied
laterally for design of interior walls, permanent partitions, and temporary
partitions that exceed 6 feet in height, except where earthquake or other lateral
loads are greater.
Wind Loads on Building Additions . Consider building additions to be designed
as parts of a totally new building without regard to shielding from the original
building and without regard to lesser wind resistance for which the original
building may have been designed. The original portion of the building may
require strengthening due to an increase in the wind loads.
Equipment Support Resonance . Equipment supports are designed to avoid
1.6.5
resonance resulting from the harmony between the natural frequency of the
structure and the operating frequency of reciprocating or rotating equipment
supported on the structure. Resonance effects may be minimized by designing
equipment isolation supports to reduce the dynamic transmission of the applied
load to as low a level as can be economically achieved.
1.6.6
Creep and Shrinkage . Concrete and masonry structures should be investigated
for stresses and deformations induced by creep and shrinkage.
1.6.7
Environmental Concrete Storage Structures . Environmental concrete storage
structures for containment, treatment, or transmission of water, wastewater, and
low-, intermediate-, and high-level radioactive wastes or other fluids should be
designed and constructed to be watertight, with minimal or no cracks.
ACI addresses this aspect through attention to detailing. Controlling cracks is
described in ACI 224.1R, Causes, Evaluation, and Repair of Cracks in Concrete
Structures; ACI 224.2R, Cracking of Concrete Members in Direct Tension; and
ACI.3R, Joints in Concrete Construction. Some special concrete mixes are
available to minimize cracks. These include shrinkage-compensating concrete
and a special mix using ground granulated blast-furnace slag and fly ash. In
general, these mixes, combined with proper construction techniques, can be
used to control cracks in the concrete.
II-22


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