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Industrial Hazards Exposure
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Confinement - hdbk1132990156


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
documented. The review and field investigation that removes ALL power
needs to ensure the safe removal of electrical equipment and wiring systems.
Hazards Mitigation.
2.13.3
Criticality Prevention . One technique that can minimize the impact of the
large inventory uncertainty would be to integrate characterization data and
work plans to keep the " ffected"inventory less than some predetermined
a
value by scheduling sections of the building, systems, or components to be
worked at the varying times and ensuring that waste packaging and
segregation and even waste storage schemes include criticality reviews.
Portable neutron or alpha instrumentation and in-process active/passive
neutron interrogation technologies should be added as needed to give real-
time updated information of the inventory as the project or operation proceeds.
A significant technical issue that should be addressed for every waste package
or configuration is the way the package density or detector/target geometry
affects any neutron measurement.
Electrical Power. The use of a construction-type power system to support the
decommissioning work should always be considered for anything but the
simplest project. The elimination of ALL power from a structure, except that
which is specifically brought in on a temporary basis, greatly reduces the
chances of inadvertent encounters with live electrical equipment. These
temporary systems should be sized to meet the need, colored to stand out, and
built to withstand the harsh environment (rain, snow, wind, and falling objects)
encountered on a demolition site.
Power or energy for cleanup operations should fit the particular activity.
Cleanup work is generally the primary energy source generating an airborne
condition. Where loss of power could result in unacceptable releases,
consideration should be given to backup power or design of the confinement
system to include a passive confinement mode sufficient to reduce releases to
acceptable levels when combined with work stoppage. Warning or alarm
systems should be included to ensure work stoppage upon loss of active
ventilation.
I-139


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