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Radioactive Material Exposure
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Design Considerations - index
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Hazards Mitigation


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
Industrial Hazards Exposure . The changing nature of any decommissioning
project site demands not only good design and planning to eliminate as many
hazards as possible, but constant awareness of the changing conditions and
hazards present. Proper planning should sequence the work so that hands-on
work is completed in an area, or adjacent areas, before heavy equipment
demolition occurs. Other considerations include--
extremely loud operations within an area that affect workers who are
otherwise not affected;
work that may affect airflow or air quality of other facility workers;
overly prescribed protective clothing or administrative limits (a respirator
to mitigate a potential, but highly unlikely, minor exposure may introduce
a very significant risk by restricting vision or aggravating heat stress
issues);
life safety escape routes, which should be reevaluated as the facility
changes (what was an emergency escape path last week may be a
30-foot hole or a collapsed structure today);
fall protection.
Many of the old DOE structures that are being decommissioned have little or
no configuration management of the original electrical systems during the
surveillance and maintenance period. Electrical distribution systems could
have been cannibalized in the years since operations, further aggravating the
situation. This being true, one of the larger industrial hazards in a
decommissioning project is encountering live electrical equipment when
removing equipment, cutting conduit, or excavating around a facility even after
the application of lock and tags to known sources. Removing ALL electrical
power prior to the start of decommissioning within a structure should be a very
high concern. Removal in this case is defined as physical breaks in the circuit
by wire, transformer, or breaker removal, not by open breakers since old,
poorly maintained breakers could stick or malfunction. Even the task of
removing ALL electrical power can be daunting. Over the years as missions
change, extra or different voltage power may have been added and not
I-138


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