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Process Development cont'd
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Design Considerations - index
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Facility Layout


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
PART II: GOOD PRACTICES
INTRODUCTION
The following sections address discipline-oriented engineering good practices. The following
ground rules were applied in compiling and editing this material:
It should not duplicate or conflict with material already treated in national codes and
standards.
Where national codes and standards treat the subpart area, the material should be good
practice extensions of the provisions of the codes and standards.
Where no applicable codes and standards exist, the information should represent the
good practice knowledge of experienced engineers.
It was not always possible to adhere to these ground rules, especially in avoiding the repetition
of material from national codes and standards, but hopefully any such departures from the
ground rules are limited.
1.
ARCHITECTURAL CONSIDERATIONS
This section contains information on general facility layout, equipment arrangement,
piping design and layout, and special systems common to DOE nuclear facilities. These
considerations include both nuclear and nonnuclear criteria that are recognized as good
practice but are generally not included in national codes and standards.
The design of the plant arrangement should be based on the functional requirements of
the facilities and the lessons learned from past operational and maintenance
experience. Certain aspects of the arrangement and layout, such as egress and
access, must satisfy the building code or local code requirements. Other requirements,
such as bend radius of pipes, location of fire walls, and separation requirements, should
also be code-dependent; technical information is available to address these issues.
II-1


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