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Piping Design
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Design Considerations - index
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Water Hammer


DOE-HDBK-1132-99
Primary and secondary piping should be supported and anchored.
Supports should be adequate to carry the weight of the lines and
maintain proper alignment.
Pipe guides and anchors should be provided to keep pipes in accurate
alignment; direct the expansion movement; and prevent buckling,
swaying, and undue strain. Spider-type supports should be provided
inside the encasement piping to permit lead detection.
Steam and Condensate Systems .
3.1.4
Steam lines should slope 1/8 inch per foot in the direction of steam flow.
Lines with lesser slopes should have provisions for slower warm-up to
allow condensate time to flow to the traps. Condensate removal
provisions should also be placed at shorter intervals to reduce
accumulation of condensate.
Each low point should have a steam trap and free blow with drainage
provisions to a lower elevation. If condensate from steam traps
discharges into a common header, a check valve is typically located
downstream of each trap. The maximum backpressure that is possible in
the header is normally designed to not impede the flow of condensate.
Drip legs should include a steam trap and blowdown drains. For steam
lines less the 3 inches, the drip should be the same diameter as the run
pipe and the blowdown line and valve should be a least inch.
Blowdown (free blow) lines are normally sized to accommodate all
condensation developed during steam line warm up.
Provisions should be made to drain condensate from the upstream side
of isolation valves. Small bypass lines can be installed around pressure
reduction stations and around larger isolation valves. Condensate
drainage from each drip leg is typically adequate for drainage of all
condensate from the full-open warm-up bypass valve. Bypass valves are
II-36


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