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Source Documents - hdbk11392003vol30143
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Chemical Management (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements - index
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Standards Forms Used in Chemical Disposition


DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2003
Appendix A - Typical Screening Process Steps
DISPOSITION OF EXCESS OR SURPLUS CHEMICALS USING FEDS/ EADS:
DOE-PMR, FPMR AND FMR REQUIREMENTS
The potential avenues of disposition open to an excess chemical depend on its hazard/risk/value
characteristics. Excess precious metals shall be returned to DOE's Precious Metals Pool located in Oak
Ridge, Tennessee. As shown in Table A-1, the first step in the typical disposition cycle is to screen excess
chemicals for reutilization within the DOE complex through the Energy Asset Disposal System (EADS)
for a 15-day period. At the conclusion of internal DOE screening, four categories of High risk property
identified as Export controlled property, Proliferation-sensitive property, Especially designed or prepared
property, and Nuclear weapon components or weapon-like components61 shall be dispositioned in
accordance with the DOE Personal Property Letter 970-3 and 41CFR109-1.53, with prior review and
approval by the OPMO. An Export Restriction Notice signed by the recipient organization shall
accompany any resulting property transfers, sales, or other offerings.
Among the remaining six High risk property categories is Hazardous property (as defined in DOE-PPL
970-3 and 41CFR109-1.100-51(a)), which includes hazardous materials as defined in the FPMR
(41CFR101). These chemicals may be screened through the Federal Excess Disposal System (FEDS) for
a period of 21 days, once the internal DOE screening has concluded in accordance with 41CFR109-42,
41CFR101-42, and 41CFR102-36. Excess chemicals may be transferred to another federal agency using
the federal excess screening process in FEDS. The remaining surplus chemicals will become eligible for
donation to non-profit donees through surplus screening by the State Agencies for Surplus Property
(SASPs). The next step in the disposition process is a sale conducted by the GSA regional office (or by
the DOE contractor with approval from GSA) to the public through a competitive bid or auction sale
process. The ultimate fate of any remaining surplus chemicals rests with the owning DOE organization,
which may elect to put the chemicals back into the disposition cycle or declare them as solid waste
(unless they are recyclable under the universal waste provisions) and dispose of them under appropriate
EPA, State, and local laws and regulations.
In cases involving excess or surplus chemicals with no market value, when holding a sale is not an
economically viable option, abandonment or destruction (see Table A-2) may be permitted, with approval
by the authorized DOE property management official. Where feasible, sale to the public as scrap or
donation to public bodies (i.e., any public agency, Indian tribe, or agency of the Federal government) is
the preferred option in lieu of abandoning or destroying the property. Donation is not an option for
chemical products that require destruction for health, safety, or security reasons. A public notice of intent
to destroy shall not be issued in such cases.
Any U.S. Munitions List item (MLI) or Commerce Control List item (CCLI) that requires
demilitarization is identifiable by an assigned demilitarization code that indicates the type of and scope of
demilitarization and/or export controls that must be undertaken before the item could be transferred to a
non-DOD entity. For a listing of these codes and additional guidance, refer to "DOD Demilitarization
and Trade Security Control Manual", DOD 4160.21-M-1. Only demilitarized property may be offered for
public sale or donated to public bodies.
61
Nuclear materials and radiological materials fall outside the scope of this chapter.
121


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