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Practice Under Supervision
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Guide to Good Practices for On-The-Job Training - index
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Common Training Errors - hdbk12060029


DOE-HDBK-1206-98
The conclusion of the training phase of OJT usually consists of three important elements. The
first element is a summary of the training and is the last "T" of effective training--"tell them what
you told them." The summary consists of a review of the learning objectives and the task
steps. The instructor should make positive comments and praise what the trainee did well.
This should be done even during review of an area in which the trainee had difficulty.
However, it is equally important to discuss the areas in which the trainee had difficulty,
because suggestions for ways to improve specific difficulties is also important feedback.
The second element is to provide additional motivation for the trainee. Reinforce how this
training will help him/her perform on-the-job and discuss how it relates to previous and future
training.
The last element is to document the training. Facility training procedures should specify how
the instructor documents completion of training. One method is to document the training on
the individual's OJT checklist.
OJT instructors are sometimes ineffective in their role as trainers for a variety of reasons. This
section contains common errors that OJT instructors sometimes commit.
Trying to Teach Too Much--No one can really learn a very complex task all at once. Rather,
people should be taught elements of the task (enabling objectives) and develop skills in doing
those elements before they are taught the total operation. In short, don't try to teach a
complex task as a complete unit. Break the task into understandable parts.
Attempting to Teach Too Fast--Attempting to teach the task too rapidly forces the trainee to
perform a task when he/she is not ready. Many instructors feel that training can sometimes be
done more rapidly than it can. This usually happens when they are very familiar with the task
and feel it's easy to accomplish.
Lack of an Overview--OJT instructors sometimes skip the overview of the task because they
know the job very well, and feel the trainee should be able to follow their explanation and
demonstration without the first "T" of effective training.
Failure to Recognize Individual Differences in Trainees--Some trainees learn more quickly and
easily than others because people vary in their working knowledge and skills (mental and/or
physical dexterity, visual acuity). Learning speed is a function of both mental and physical
skills. Effective instructors adapt their training styles to the individual differences and
capabilities of their trainees.
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