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Good Practices - s1039cn10017
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Guide to Good Practices for Control of Equipment and System Status
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Equipment Locking and Tagging


DOE-STD-1039-93
The operations supervisor should ensure that all facility personnel are aware of the potential
impact their activities may have on the status of equipment and systems, and that they
obtain concurrence prior to beginning work that could change the status of equipment. Any
status changes that occur during the progress of work should be reported to the responsible
operator or the operations supervisor. Additional guidance concerning the reporting of
process- and status-related information is contained in DOE Order 5480.19, Chapter XIII,
"Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes."
4.2 Equipment and System Alignment
Operations personnel should be aware of the alignment of systems and equipment within
their area, whatever the current mode of operation (i.e., startup, shutdown, normal
operations, or maintenance). Alignment checklists should be developed for all modes of
operation and incorporated into the appropriate procedures. These checklists should be
used as guides for operators to use in establishing the correct component positions when
placing systems and equipment into service or other operating modes. They should identify
each component by the exact name and identifying number that appears on the component
label. They should identify the required alignment position (e.g., open, shut, on, off), make
provision for signature or initials verifying the component position, and provide space to
annotate any deviation.
The frequency for performing or verifying system alignments depends on the level of control
required and the level of operating activity. For example, if a system has minimal impact
on safety or process output, and is maintained in a steady-state operating mode (e.g.,
normal operation, standby) with few changes in component status, then it may not be
necessary to perform complete or frequent alignment checks. However, if a system is
critical to safety or process output, or is constantly undergoing component status changes
(e.g., valve manipulations), then more frequent alignment checks would be appropriate.
Equipment and system alignment should be verified following any maintenance activity,
including testing, if the activity could have placed components in a position other than that
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