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Management Monitoring - std10510029
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Guideline to Good Practices For Maintenance Organization and Administration
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Quantitative Indicators


DOE-STD-1051-93
a.
Management Tours
Managers should periodically monitor important activities and functions
during plant tours. The frequency and scope of management tours should be
based on the importance of the equipment and activities to safe and reliable
plant operation and on the extent of current problems in these areas. The
practice of conducting tours of plant areas should be a planned part of each
manager's routine.
Management tours should cover areas such as critical plant operations areas,
as well as less frequented areas. Tours should also include radiologically
controlled and relatively inaccessible areas. Some tours should be conducted on
back shifts and weekends. In addition to observing performance of personnel in
their specific jobs, industrial safety conditions and practices, radiological
conditions and practices, materiel conditions and housekeeping should be closely
observed during management tours to ensure expected standards are maintained.
Deficiencies noted during these tours should be documented and provided to
responsible managers and supervisors for correction. Items that are corrected
during the tour should also be documented for information purposes. Follow-up
should be conducted to ensure timely and effective corrective action has been
achieved.
b.
Performance Monitoring
Activities monitored should include those performed by non-facility as well as
permanent personnel, with emphasis on activities that affect safe and reliable
plant operation. Monitoring should include actual observations of work in
progress. Firmly scheduled blocks of time of one to three hours have proven
effective for observations of activities. Observations should be followed by
associated follow-up and reporting actions. Each manager should also
occasionally monitor activities in an area for which he is not responsible to
provide a fresh look at the performance of the activity.
Routine activities that should be monitored include the following:
1)
Operational evolutions or work in progress to observe radiological
protection and industrial safety practices, procedural adherence, work
habits, teamwork, and communications
2)
Shift turnovers in work locations to observe formality, thoroughness, and
continuity of activities
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