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Part 3. Respiratory Protection Program
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Radiological Control - index
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Part 4. Handling Radiologically Contaminated Personnel


DOE-STD-1098-99
Radiological Control
Radiological Health Support Operations
June 2004
1.
Individuals using respiratory protection shall:
a.
Perform fit checks of close-fitting respirators to ensure a proper seal before entering areas requiring respirator
use
b.
Be clean shaven in the area of fit, if applicable
c.
Use corrective lenses, if needed, that are approved for respirators
d.
Be trained to leave the work area when experiencing respirator failure
e.
Be trained to remove their respirators to avoid life -threatening situations when exiting an area after respirator
failure [see 29 CFR 1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2].
534 Heat Stress
Heat stress may result from working in areas of high heat, humidity, and radiant heat; working in protective clothing; and
using respirators, particularly where other protective equipment is required. Heat stress has occurred at ambient
temperatures less than 70F when multiple sets of anti-contamination clothing or plastic suits were in use or strenuous
work was required.
1.
The planning stages for work in hot environments should address heat stress controls.
2.
Job supervisors should inform their personnel of heat stress precautions prior to work on job assignments in hot
environments. Precautions that should be considered during work that includes a high probability of heat stress
include:
a.
Engineering controls to modera te the work area environment;
b.
Appropriate work time limits;
c.
Use of protective clothing made of materials that wick perspiration away from the body;
d.
Use of body cooling devices;
e.
Provision of beverages at or near the work site, using appropriate contamination controls;
f.
Relaxation of protective clothing requirements.
3.
If an individual begins to feel symptoms of heat illness, the individual should immediately notify the nearest co-
worker, exit the area, remove personal protective equipment, notify the supervisor, and rest in a cool area. In such
cases, medical assistance should be provided.
535 Half-Face Respirators
Half-face respirators have limited applications because of the design of the facial seal area. As a result, their permitted
protection factor is low. Full-face respirators are generally preferred over half-face respirators because of the significant
increase in protection offered with minimal loss of worker comfort.
1.
The use of half-face respirators is permitted in situations where intakes of radioactive material will be low, such as
those resulting in a few millirem, and where industrial and safety considerations warrant, such as during the
operation of heavy equipment.
2.
Due to the limited protection afforded by half-face respirators, DOE discourages the use of half-face respirators for
emergency evacuation purposes.
5-11


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