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DOE-STD-3014-96
e.
For each such impact location, (1) the extent of local and global damage
and depth of penetration, (2) identification of structural failures, (3) path and
final location of missiles, (4) location of fuel, and (5) damage status of
safety-class SSCs. (Derived)
f.
Accident scenario information. (Available from existing facility safety
analysis documents)
Outputs:
a.
Release scenarios for each of the aircraft subcategory impact locations that
could result in damage that could lead to a release (or a finding that no
release would actually occur).
b.
For each release scenario, the fraction of the facility area and/or skid area
where the aircraft impact could lead to the scenario.
c.
The annual frequency of each such release scenario and the total of all
such frequencies (i.e., the final release frequency).
d.
A list of the release scenarios that contribute to the total annual release
frequency exceeding the release frequency evaluation guideline (if any).
Exposure Evaluation. Exposure evaluation consists of performing a detailed but still
3.6
conservative analysis of the potential hazardous material exposure to any member of the
public (and, where appropriate, to onsite workers) resulting from an aircraft crash into the
facility. The results of the release frequency evaluation (for those scenarios that could
result in a material release) are used to define the specific source term and exposure
scenarios. This process considers how much of the facility is damaged, how much of the
hazardous material available in the facility is affected, what release mechanisms affect
the material, how much of the material is converted into a form that can be absorbed into
the body and do harm, and what energy is associated with the release. The result of this
analysis is expressed as a dose (for radioactive materials) or a concentration (for
chemical hazards) to the maximally exposed individual at or beyond the site boundary.
The methodology for the analysis is provided in Section 7.3. Once this step is
accomplished, the analysis required under this standard is complete and the results are
documented.
31


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