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DOE Standard Accident Analysis For Aircraft Crash Into Hazardous Facilities
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Parameter Assumptions


DOE-STD-3014-96
APPENDIX D
D.1.
Nuclear Exposure Evaluation. The following guidance is intended to assist the analyst
(post-structural) in modeling aircraft crashes in terms of appropriate parameter
assumptions in dispersion modeling and consequence assessment.
D.1.1 Parameter Assumptions. A set of conservative parameter assumptions is made
as follows:
a.
MARi - The material at risk is considered to be the inventory of hazardous
materials for the ith material form, as discussed in Section 7.2.2.
b.
DRij - The damage ratio is generated as follows. With respect to the
phenomenon of crush/impact, the damage ratio is equal to the fraction of
MAR within areas directly impacted by aircraft debris (i.e., all areas in the
path of the penetrators, as established by the structural analysis) and
other areas of the facility determined to collapse as a result of the
penetration (as established by the structural analysis). This damage ratio
may be reduced for material in robust containment for which it can be
established that not all the material will be exposed. For instance, it may
be possible to use geometrical or energy-balance considerations to
estimate a maximum number of cans, pails, or drums with which a given
aircraft fragment might interact during impact.
With respect to the phenomenon of fire, the damage ratio is equal to the
fraction of MAR within areas directly impacted by aircraft debris and, given
the presence of combustible loading to support the propagation of fire, any
adjacent areas within the same fire zone (i.e., up to the next intact fire
boundary). Further, if it is determined that the available combustible
loading will support a fire of a duration in excess of the rating of the next
intact fire boundary, the damage ratio is adjusted to include any MAR in
the adjacent fire zones. Mitigating factors may be evaluated. However,
given the difficulty of demonstrating that any available fire suppression
systems would remain functional following an aircraft impact,
D-1


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