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Format - s1031cn0018
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Guide to Good Practices for Communications - index
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Face-to-Face Communication


DOE-STD-1031-92
unless directed otherwise or where environmental conditions or personnel
hazards require evacuation for personnel safety). If conditions require
immediate evacuation, contact should be made with the Control Area after
successful evacuation.
4.1.2.3
Repeatback
In operational communications, the receiver should repeat the message
back to the sender. This is especially important when receiving instructions
involving operation of facility equipment to assure the sender that the
instruction is correctly understood. A verbatim repeatback is preferred,
although paraphrasing may be used as long as the intent of the message is
clearly stated. If notations of equipment, numbers, and positions were made
during the original transmission, the repeatback should contain the same
information.
Example: "Control Area, this is the Building Operator. Understand, open
Cooling Water Suction Valve, Foxtrot two five."
The sender must listen carefully to repeated messages to ensure the
receiver understands the message. If the receiver repeats the message
incorrectly, the sender should immediately correct the receiver by saying
"Wrong" and repeat the message until properly received.
4.1.2.4
Confirmation
After the repeatback, the sender should confirm or correct the receiver. The
absence of the confirmation step may result in miscommunication because
the receiver may have misheard the instructions and repeated erroneous
information. A lack of response by the sender may be misinterpreted as
silent confirmation that the repeated message was correct. However, the
receiver should not carry out the action until confirmation is received.
Example: "Building Operator, this is the Control Area Operator. That is
correct."
4.1.2.5
Reportbacks
Another part of operational communication is the reportback. When directed
to perform a task, a report should be made concerning the completion of the
task or difficulties encountered as soon as possible. The appropriate
supervisor or control area operator should acknowledge this communication
so that the sender is confident the report was received.
4.1.2.6
Briefings for Operators
Briefings can provide information to operators during normal and emergency
operating conditions. Information should be concisely transferred among
the operators by well organized briefings. Managers can ask questions or
9


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